Bank Foreclosures to Surge in 2012: RealtyTrac – TheStreet

According to RealtyTrac, a new wave of foreclosures could be coming in 2012, if the recent spike in “default filings” is any indication.

A total of 3.6 million properties have been lost to foreclosure since the start of the recession in December 2007. In 2011, however, the pace of monthly repossessions slowed down and in fact hit a 44-month low in November at 56,124 according todata provided by RealtyTrac.

Overall, banks repossessed 25% fewer properties in 2011 compared to 2010. However, much of the slowdown was caused by “foreclosure processing delays” rather than a robust housing recovery, says Daren Blomquist, RealtyTrac’s director of marketingcommunications.

Controversy over “robo-signing”practices caused a flurry of investigations into banks foreclosure practices and have caused mortgage servicers to re-evaluate their procedures, leading to a slowdown in processing.

States where foreclosures are approved through a judicial process are seeing the longest delays. For instance, New York properties foreclosed in the third quarter took an average of 986 days to complete the foreclosure process.

“Those foreclosure processing delays mean much of the foreclosure activity that under normal circumstances would have occurred in 2011 is being deferred to 2012,” Blomquist said in an email, pointing to a rise in default filings, which start the foreclosure process.

The number of filings providing notice of default spiked 33% to 78,880 in August and have remained elevated since then.

“This new wave will not bring foreclosure numbers back to the levels we saw in 2010, but they will create a sort of double-peak pattern after the artificial trough in 2011,” according to Blomquist.

The foreclosure forecast comes as analysts are beginning to predict a rebound in housing prices in 2012 as home prices bottom and affordability remains at its best level in decades.

Bank of America(BAC_), JPMorgan Chase(JPM_) and Wells Fargo(WFC_) are the nation’s biggest mortgage servicers, together accounting for more than 60% of the first mortgages in the country.

A modest rebound in housing might, however, not be sufficient to save Bank of America , which has been the most weighed down by mortgage woes.

Bank Foreclosures to Surge in 2012: RealtyTrac – TheStreet:

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About Law Office of Daniela P. Romero, APLC

We represent consumers and in Chapter 7 and 13 bankruptcy cases within the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Central District of California. Get a fresh start! Nosotros representamos a individuos y pequeñas empresas en el Capítulo 7 y 13 casos de bancarrota en el Tribunal de Quiebras de los Estados Unidos para el Distrito Central de California. Empiece de nuevo!
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2 Responses to Bank Foreclosures to Surge in 2012: RealtyTrac – TheStreet

  1. Dave Velasco says:

    I think with foreclosure rate going up, renting would become an ideal option for most families and individuals in the US – this is if more foreclosures (as expected) are tend to come.I think individuals should maintain a good credit score as 2012 enters and pay their debts as much as possible so that they can avoid foreclosures by having a home refinancing mortgage. Real estate schools worry this as the housing market falls own, individuals who wants to build a career in real estate is quite getting discourage as they see the market no actually improving.

  2. W. Home says:

    It will be like a trending situation in 2012, as foreclosures will ravage in some housing market, this could be a major change for the global housing status especially in the US. With online real estate schools also trying their best to educate people and make solutions in stopping foreclosures.

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